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Jim Teeuwen 76f54ee732 Merge pull request #24 from lmas/master 3 years ago
LICENSE Switch to more liberay CC0 public domain license 8 years ago
README.md Adds a more complete set of numeric type conversion methods to Node. 6 years ago
document.go Ops, some leftover crap. 3 years ago
entitymap.go gofix go1rename 7 years ago
node.go added SelectNodesDirect function 4 years ago
test.xml Got rid of depracated Node api functions. Removed dependency on go-iconv in favor of go-charset (See README). go-charset is a native Go package and thus requires no CGO functionality. Meaning go-pkg-xmlx and go-pkg-rss can now be used in Google AppEngine. Some speed and memory efficiency improvements added. Should now do a lot less []byte -> string conversions. 7 years ago
test1.xml Adds optional indented output for the Node.String() and Node.Bytes() 6 years ago
test2.xml Minor improvements in Node.Bytes() implementation. Some test case tweaking. 7 years ago
test3.xml fix: String() handled ns prefixes incorrectly 5 years ago
test4.xml Implement text nodes / content escaping 5 years ago
xmlx_test.go added SelectNodesDirect function 4 years ago

README.md

XMLX

This package wraps the standard XML library and uses it to build a node tree of any document you load. This allows you to look up nodes forwards and backwards, as well as perform search queries (no xpath support).

Nodes now simply become collections and don’t require you to read them in the order in which the xml.Parser finds them.

Dependencies

None.

API

The Document currently implements 2 simple search functions which allow you to look for specific nodes.

*document.SelectNode(namespace, name string) *Node;
*document.SelectNodes(namespace, name string) []*Node;

SelectNode() returns the first, single node it finds matching the given name and namespace. SelectNodes() returns a slice containing all the matching nodes.

Note that these search functions can be invoked on individual nodes as well. This allows you to search only a subset of the entire document.

Each node exposes also a number of functions which allow easy access to a node value or an attribute value. They come in various forms to allow transparent conversion to types: int, int64, uint, uint64, float32, float64:

*node.S(ns, name string) string
*node.I(ns, name string) int
*node.I8(ns, name string) int8
*node.I16(ns, name string) int16
*node.I32(ns, name string) int32
*node.I64(ns, name string) int64
*node.U(ns, name string) uint
*node.U8(ns, name string) uint8
*node.U16(ns, name string) uint16
*node.U32(ns, name string) uint32
*node.U64(ns, name string) uint64
*node.F32(ns, name string) float32
*node.F64(ns, name string) float64
*node.B(ns, name string) bool

Note that these functions actually consider child nodes for matching names as well as the current node. In effect they first perform a node.SelectNode() and then return the value of the resulting node converted to the appropriate type. This allows you to do this:

Consider this piece of xml:

<car>
   <color>red</color>
   <brand>BMW</brand>
</car>

Now this code:

node := doc.SelectNode("", "car")
brand := node.S("", "brand")

Eventhough brand is not the name of node, we still get the right value back (BMW), because node.S() searches through the child nodes when looking for the value if the current node does not match the given namespace and name.

For attributes, we only go through the attributes of the current node this function is invoked on:

*node.As(ns, name string) string
*node.Ai(ns, name string) int
*node.Ai8(ns, name string) int8
*node.Ai16(ns, name string) int16
*node.Ai32(ns, name string) int32
*node.Ai64(ns, name string) int64
*node.Au(ns, name string) uint
*node.Au8(ns, name string) uint8
*node.Au16(ns, name string) uint16
*node.Au32(ns, name string) uint32
*node.Au64(ns, name string) uint64
*node.Af32(ns, name string) float32
*node.Af64(ns, name string) float64
*node.Ab(ns, name string) bool

All of these functions return either “” or 0 when the specified node or attribute could not be found. No errors are generated.

The namespace name specified in the functions above must either match the namespace you expect a node/attr to have, or you can specify a wildcard *. This makes node searches easier in case you do not care what namespace name there is or if there is one at all. Node and attribute names as well, may be supplied as the wildcard *. This allows us to fetch all child nodes for a given namespace, regardless of their names.

All numeric type-conversion methods assume base-10 numbers data.

License

This work is subject to the CC0 1.0 Universal (CC0 1.0) Public Domain Dedication license. Its contents can be found in the LICENSE file.